Explore the fascinating world of the Victorian judges at this award-winning historic house.

People in a Victorian town

The Judge
The Judge
Workers from the grocers shop
Workers from the grocers shop
Ironmonger
Ironmonger
Maids
Maids
Local Gents
Local Gents
Local Lady and Her Friend
Local Lady and Her Friend
The Chairman of the Magistrates
The Chairman of the Magistrates
A respectable Gentleman
A respectable Gentleman
The ladies from the shoe shop
The ladies from the shoe shop
A Radnorshire Constable
A Radnorshire Constable
A Town Band member
A Town Band member
The School Mistress
The School Mistress
A Stable Boy
A Stable Boy
Labourers
Labourers
Who is this man?
Who is this man?

Who's who in Presteigne in 1868?

Victorian Presteigne had a population of less than 2000 people, not too different from today. So who were these people and what did they do? In this section you will find a selection of pictures of Victorian residents, from Judge to stable boy, and some information about trades in the town, taken from an 1868 trade directory.

Have a look at their faces, study their clothes, Think through the different types of trades people did and remember that more tradesmen were needed than today, where we depend on traveling to large towns and cities for certain goods.

If you are visiting Presteigne, take a look at the High Street today and see of you can spot traces of the old retailers, such as Newell's Ironmongers - still bearing the family name above the door. (We have a collection of items from this shop on display in our local history rooms).

Look at the people - you can click the small images to see larger ones. What did they do?

 

 

The pictures in this section are the copyright of The Judge's Lodging & C. Leversedge.
They may be reproduced only for educational purposes.
Any other use must be by written consent.

 

 

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Strange But True

  • list arrowWould you wee in your dining room?

    Victorian gentlemen did! Some dining rooms (like ours) had a special cupboard to house a chamber pot so all the gentlemen could go for a wee without leaving the table (once the ladies had left the room, of course!).

     

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